Hershel 400 Objects in Perseus


Abbreviations in the CON column are the IAU versions.
The column TYPE has following abbreviations:
OPNCL = open cluster PLNNB = planetary nebula GLOCL = globular cluster CL+NB = open cluster and nebulosity BRTNB = bright emission or reflection nebula
Hubble Classification for galaxies or GALXY where no classification existed.

In the Herschel Column the Classes are:
I = Bright Nebulae III = Very Faint Nebulae V = Very Large
Nebulae
VII = Pretty Much Compressed
Clusters of Large or Small Stars
II = Faint Nebulae IV = Planetary Nebulae VI = Very Compressed and Rich Clusters of Stars VIII = Coarsely Scattered
Clusters of Stars
NGC_#
Con
Type
RA_2000
Declination
Mag
Size
Hershel_#
Observation Notes
651 PER PLNNB 01 42.3 +51 34 11.0 163"X107" H I 193 M-76 is a small planetary nebula and it is the dimmest Messier object. Mechain found this object in Sept. 1780. It is often called the Barbell or Little Dumbbell because of its' resemblance to M-27 in Vulpecula. M-76 shows some excellant detail at high powers. I obviously realized this even as a beginning observer because I have observed this object with every telescope I have ever owned. In my 8" f/6 at 150X it showed the dual structure that made William Herschel assign it two numbers. When J.L.E. Dreyer was assembling the NGC he agreed and M-76 is NGC 650 and NGC 651. On a pretty sharp evening at a dark sky site, the 17.5" f/4.5 at 175X brings out several faint loops of nebulosity beyond the bright central bar. There are several dark lanes within the bright inner section. This is with a UHC filter. Without the filter M-76 is a light grey in color. An 18" f/6 makes the ends of the central part brighter than the middle and the 651 faint outer loops are easy with the filter. This is on a night I rated 8/10 for seeing and transparency at a very dark desert site over 100 miles from Phoenix. Years of exp
869 PER OPNCL 02 19.0 +57 09 4.3 30.0' H VI 33 and NGC 884 the Double Cluster is naked eye as a bright spot in the Winter Milky Way from even a somewhat light polluted site. Hipparchus and Ptolemy both mention it in ancient texts. These two clusters are both large, bright, rich and somewhat compressed. The fact that they are both within a 1 degree field of view is fascinating. Using a 38mm Erfle eyepiece which gives about 60X in the 13", I counted 102* in one quadrant of the field of view for a total of at least 400* in the field. The view in the 11X80 finder is spectacular with several orange giant stars sprinkling the clusters, including one almost exactly between the two clusters. There are also several beautiful chains of stars curving into the Milky Way from within this cluster pair.
884 PER OPNCL 02 22.4 +57 07 4.4 30.0' H VI 34 and NGC 869 the Double Cluster is naked eye as a bright spot in the Winter Milky Way from even a somewhat light polluted site. Hipparchus and Ptolemy both mention it in ancient texts. These two clusters are both large, bright, rich and somewhat compressed. The fact that they are both within a 1 degree field of view is fascinating. Using a 38mm Erfle eyepiece which gives about 60X in the 13", I counted 102* in one quadrant of the field of view for a total of at least 400* in the field. The view in the 11X80 finder is spectacular with several orange giant stars sprinkling the clusters, including one almost exactly between the two clusters. There are also several beautiful chains of stars curving into the Milky Way from within this cluster pair.
1023 PER E7p 02 40.5 +39 03 11.0 9'X4' H I 156 Pretty bright, large, much elongated, bright middle at 135X. Raising the power to 200X brings out a small tuft on the Eastern tip of this galaxy.
1245 PER OPNCL 03 14.7 +47 15 8.4 10' H VI 25 is a bright, large and much compressed open cluster. In the 13" at 165X I counted 82 members, many in nice chains of stars that form curved lines. This cluster takes high power well.
1342 PER OPNCL 03 31.6 +37 20 6.7 14.0' H VIII 88 is a bright, large and somewhat scattered open cluster in the 13" at 100X. There are about 40* in the group and a dark lane in the Milky Way near the cluster.
1444 PER OPNCL 03 49.4 +52 40 6.6 4.0' H VIII 80 Pretty faint, small, compressed, not rich, 14 stars counted at 165X, including a nice yellow-blue pair.
1513 PER OPNCL 04 10.0 +49 31 8.4 9.0' H VII 60 Pretty bright, pretty large, rich and somewhat compressed at 100X. 34* counted, including a nice arc of pretty bright stars on the North side. The bizarre thing about this cluster is that it is shaped like a horseshoe. Wouldn't it be fun to fly out there and see if that is the true shape of this cluster?
1528 PER OPNCL 04 15.4 +51 14 6.4 24.0' H VII 61 Bright, large, rich and somewhat compressed cluster. 55* counted at 100X, many in lovely chains. Several dark lanes wind their way through the cluster. It almost fills the field of view. This object is easy in the 11X80 finder. This very nice cluster could have been a Messier object if he had only swept this area.
1545 PER OPNCL 04 20.9 +50 15 6.2 18.0' H VIII 85 Pretty bright, pretty poor, not compressed cluster at 100X. 21* counted, two pretty bright yellow members and several dim members.